Cardwell, Byron P. (Portland)

Byron P. Cardwell (1832-1903)(Portland)

Cardwell, J. R.

Ellsworth, Frank

Buchtel & Cardwell

Ellsworth & Cardwell

Chronology

1859-1865 Portland (Buchtel & Cardwell)

1866 Cardwell Gallery

April 19, 1866-January 1, 1867 Cardwell & Ellsworth

Employee Listings

Desmond, R. A. Mr., operator 1866

A substantial amount of confusion exists about the four Cardwells mentioned in this book. To summarize briefly, Buchtel and B. P. Cardwell opened a photograph studio in 1859. A brother of Byron, J. R. Cardwell opened a dental operation in this same building, next to Buchtel and Cardwell’s gallery. In 1864 J. R. Cardwell may have acquired the interest of B. P. Cardwell and entered the partnership with Buchtel. The third, R. H. Cardwell, was another brother who briefly had a Portland studio but moved to Seattle and then to Astoria. Also Buchtel shared a building with W. B. Cardwell, surgeon, at First and Morrison in 1876.

Please also see Joseph Buchtel, Hamilton Campbell, Frank Dalton, R. H. Cardwell, R. A. Desmond.

Byron P. Cardwell arrived in Oregon in 1852 at age 20. He probably learned photography from his uncle, Hamilton Campbell, an itinerant daguerreotypist from Corvallis. In 1859 Campbell moved to San Francisco to be a photographer, and Cardwell may have moved to Portland to work with Buchtel at this time. Buchtel knew Campbell, having worked on his boat in 1853.

From 1859-1864 B. P. Cardwell had a partnership with Joseph Buchtel. The reader is refereed to the Buchtel biography for information about Cardwell during their partnership. In 1864, B. P. Cardwell was appointed Assistant Assessor and Deputy Collector of Internal Revenue for the District of Oregon.

It appears that J. R. Cardwell, the dentist, bought the partnership share of his brother. 1864 advertising names J. R. Cardwell as the active partner. The Buchtel & Cardwell partnership continued operating under that name until early 1865.

On 10 January 1865, the Oregonian announced the Buchtel & Cardwell gallery had sold out. J. R. Cardwell announced that the Cardwell gallery was open for business at the old address. Buchtel soon announced he was an operator in A. B. Woodard’s gallery. The dissolution of the Buchtel & Cardwell’s partnership had left Cardwell in an advantageous position, controlling the well known studio location in Shelby’s building. Also Cardwell was able to keep R. A. Desmond, their chief photographer. Desmond, an employee of Brady’s gallery, had moved to Portland from New York and accepted a job as operator with Buchtel & Cardwell in March of 1864. He is spoken of very highly in contemporary reports, and there is little doubt he was an important asset to Cardwell’s enterprise.

On 2 March 1865, J. R. Cardwell announced he had sold the Gallery to F. Dalton. Dalton is one of the few Oregon photographers I have seen who used a date stamp on each photograph he made, making the tracking of the galley substantially easier. Desmond continued as the operator of Dalton’s gallery. (See Dalton, Frank in this book)

On 23 November 1865, J. R. Cardwell announced he had bought F. Dalton out, and that the Cardwell gallery was open, with R. A. Desmond as operator.

On April 19, 1866, Cardwell announced that he had a new firm, Cardwell & Ellsworth. His new partner was photographer Frank Ellsworth, who relocated to Portland from the east for this enterprise. R. A. Desmond is still advertised as their operator.

The natural history museum adjacent to the Buchtel and Cardwell’s gallery, which was mostly J. R. Cardwell’s, remained an advertised attraction through the Cardwell and Ellsworth partnership. J. R. Cardwell was an amateur taxidermist, and had won first premium at the 1861 and 1862 State Fairs. This exhibit appears to have been Portland’s first museum.

In the fall of 1866, Ellsworth & Cardwell launched an advertising campaign in the Oregonian, writing new ad copy every three days. These advertisements probably did them more harm than good, due to the ludicrous style of the copywriter. The comedy of analogies and crude attempts at cleverness are frequently a thinly veiled attack on Buchtel, who had announced the opening of his new studio on August 25th. Two months later, the newspapers announced Buchtel was awarded first premium for photography at the 1866 Oregon State Fair, and Ellsworth and Cardwell responded “Ellsworth & Cardwell sent no pictures to the State Fair this year. Those we saw there are not equal to those…which are produced at this Gallery. As these gentlemen did not contend for a premium, the fact of anyone getting it will have no weight as to superiority…”. Buchtel’s reply bristled in the next day’s paper that “his work stands for itself and does not require bombastic puffs in self written cards to recommend itself to the public”.

On December 17th Ellsworth & Cardwell announced that they were going out of business effective January 1, 1867. This was probably the result of a deal with Buchtel, who had left for San Francisco on December 13th to buy new studio equipment. Buchtel, who had only occupied his new Front and Morrison gallery for 4 months, announced his move back into the Shelby building gallery on January 21, 1867.

The 1866 advertisements provide a glimpse into Ellsworth & Cardwell’s operation. They offered to produce ambrotypes, sun pearls, mammoth photographs, ferrotypes, crayons, vignettes, life size photographs, and CDVs, plain or enameled. They also retailed stereo cards made by a New York firm. Their prices were below Buchtel’s. There is no indication they photographed anything other than studio portraits and copy work.

Artifacts

The Oregon Historical Society has a CDV portrait of Byron Cardwell (OHS 209 A-3), and a second image of him posing with Buchtel.

Photograph of Theodore Riggs, CDV vignette head shot, on unmarked mount with ms. note “Taken at Cardwell’s Gallery, Portland, Oregon, February 6, 1866” (Stanley Hess)

Directory Listings

1863 PD pg. 21 “Buchtel & Cardwell, artists, 87 First”, pg. 23 “Cardwell, B. P., (Buchtel & Cardwell) artist, 87 First St., res NW cor Harrison and Fourth.”, plus display ad pg. 22 quoted in full under Buchtel’s listing in this book.

1864 PD pg. 39 “Cardwell, B. P. Photographer, res NW corner fourth.”, “Buchtel & Cardwell, Photographers, rooms 89 First” Ellsworth not listed.

1865 PD pg. 37 “Buchtel & Cardwell, Photograph gallery, 89 First St.”, pg. 41 “Cardwell, B. P., photographer res NW cor Fourth”, photograph galleries pg. 97 “Cardwell, J. R., 89 First.”, (plus display ad quoted below) Ellsworth not listed

1867 West Coast pg. 281 Portland “Ellsworth & Cardwell, photographers 89 First”

1866 PD pg. 41 “Cardwell, B. P., photographer, res cor Fourth and Harrison”, pg. 47 “Ellsworth, Frank, res cor Fifth and Morrison with W. G. West.” (W. G. West was a messenger for Wells, Fargo & Co.)

1867 PD pg. 41 “Cardwell, Byron P, Photograph Artist, res cor Fourth and Harrison.”, “Cardwell J. R., dentist, 89 First, res 235 Second.”, pg. 49 “Ellsworth, Frank (Cardwell & Ellsworth) photograph gallery, 89 First, bds N s Washington bet Third and Fourth.”, pg. 47 “Desmond, operator at Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First, bds cor B and First”

1868 PD pg. 41 “Cardwell, Byron P., Deputy U. S. Internal Revenue Collector, res cor Fourth and Harrison.”, “Cardwell, J. R., dentist, 89 First, res 233 Second.” (also listed is Richard H. Cardwell, photographer, please see separate listing)

1869 PD pg. 43 “Cardwell, Byron, res cor Fourth and Harrison”, “Cardwell, J. R., dentist, office 89 First.”, “Cardwell, W. B., physician, office 89 First.”

1871 PD not listed

1872 PD pg. 53 “Cardwell, J. R., dentist, 89 First”

1880 PD pg. 87 “Cardwell, B. P., deputy collector Internal Revenue, res 395 Fourth”, “Cardwell, J. R., Dentist, office rm 4 Dekum’s building, res 235 Second”

1881 PD pg. 92 “Cardwell, B. P., department collector Internal Revenue, res 395 Fourth, n w cor Harrison”, “Cardwell, J. R., Dentist, 115 First, cor Washington, res w q cor Second and Columbia”

Directory listings continue throughout their lives.

Photographer’s Imprints

“Ellsworth & Cardwell, Portland,—-Oregon” CDV printed back (tr)

“Ellsworth & Cardwell, Cardwell Gallery, 89 First Street. Portland, Oregon” CDV printed back (OHS)

News Items and Advertisements

The reader is refereed to Joseph Buchtel for Buchtel and Cardwell ads.

1852: “List of Letters remaining in the Post Office at Salem, O. T., June 30, A.. D., 1852 … Cardwell, B. P.” Oregon Statesman (Salem) 10 July 1852, pg. 3, col. 2.

1856: “MARRIED – In Corvallis, at the residence of Hon. G. E. Cole, on the evening of April 32d, by the Rev. W. F. Boyakin, Mr. Byron P. Cardwell, formerly of Jacksonville, Ill., to Miss Abbie M. Clark, formerly of South Hadlay, Mass.” Oregon Argus, (Oregon City) 12 April 1856. pg. 3, col. 3. (see Wakefield for information about an 1852 daguerreotype of Abbie Clark) (item courtesy of Michael Cirelli)

1863: (List of jurors) “The Grand Jury consisting of…B. P. Cardwell…was sworn in…” Oregonian, 9 March 1863, pg. 3, col. 1

1863: “J. R. Cardwell, Surgeon Dentist…Has permanently located in Portland…Office adjoining Buchtel & Cardwell’s Picture Gallery…” Oregonian, 11 July 1863

1864: “Multnomah County Union Convention…South Portland…B. P. Cardwell” Oregonian, 14 March 1864, pg. 2 col. 2.

1864: “Notice to the Public. Notice is hereby given that the special Income Tax under the U. S. Internal Revenue Law. of the act of Congress approved June 30th, 1864, for Division No. 4, is now open for examination at my office in Salem, Marion county, for ten days from date. No change of assessment will be allowed after the expiration of the ten days. Byron Cardwell, Assistant Assessor, 4th Division, Salem, Nov. 11, 1864” Oregon Statesman, (Salem) 14 November 1864 pg. 2, col. 7

1865: “SOLD OUT – The photograph gallery on Front street which has been conducted for a long term of years by Messrs. Buchtel & Cardwell, has changed into the proprietorship of other parties. The collection of rare species of birds, animals, reptiles, etc., which forms an attractive cabinet of curiosities in natural history, has made this the finest resort in the State, and the name of the old firm have been synonymist (sic) on the part of naming and preserving the relics which have been entrusted or donated to them.” Oregonian, 10 January 1865, pg. 3, col. 1.

1865: “100,000 MEN WANTED – To sit for cards de visite, ambrotypes, life sized photographs, &c., &c., in all the latest styles

The undersigned having refitted and refurbished the old Gallery of BUCHTEL & CARDWELL, No. 89 First street, Portland, and engaged the services of MR. DESMOND, of Wm. Shew’s Gallery, San Francisco, of whom Mr. Shew says in his letter of recommendation, ‘I think he possesses all the requisite qualifications of a FIRST CLASS OPERATOR, and has the best practical knowledge of Photographic Chemistry of any man in California,’ the undersigned proposes to take One Hundred Thousand Pictures this season.

Cards will be delivered with all possible dispatch. Children will be taken in the twinkling of an eye. The public are respectfully invited to call and satisfy themselves that he is prepared to compete with any Gallery on the Pacific Coast. F. DALTON.         N. B.- Negatives will be preserved at the request of the patron.” Oregonian, 2 March – 3 April 1865 (The text changed over the course of the month. The recommendation of Shew was an addition.)

 

DALTON’S GALLERY ADS- PLENTY OF THEM- SEE DALTON, FRANK

 

1865: “Cardwell’s Gallery – It will be seen that the popular establishment, formerly known as Buchtel & Cardwell’s Gallery, on First street, and more recently as Dalton’s Gallery and Museum, has passed into the possession of Dr. Cardwell. Mr. Desmond, the somewhat famous artist, will remain in the establishment. Mr. Desmond is from the school of artists so popular in the East, and was once connected with the establishment of Brady, in New York. He has won considerable fame on the Pacific coast of late years, not a small part of which has been acquitted in Portland the past year.” Oregonian, 23 November 1865, pg. 3, col. 1.

1865: “Cardwell’s Gallery & Museum. No. 89 First Street, Portland, Oregon. Mr. Desmond – several years Brady’s Operator at New York City – will continue to take First-Class Card Pictures, and conduct the business as heretofore. J. R. Cardwell.” Oregonian, 23 November 1865 (first insertion)1866: “Cardwell’s Photographic Gallery & Museum. No. 89 First Street, Portland, Oregon. Mr. Desmond – several years Brady’s Operator at New York City – will continue to take First-Class Card Pictures, as heretofore. J. R. Cardwell.” Oregonian, 11 January 1866 (last insertion)

 

1866 Ellsworth & Cardwell Advertising

1866: “PHOTOGRAPHICAL- ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL, Proprietors of the CARDWELL GALLERY, 89 First Street, announce that they are fully prepared to meet the increasing demand for their First Class Pictures. Their CARTES DE VISITE are inimitable and beyond competition” Oregonian 9 April 1866 (first)

“NEW FIRM – Dr. Cardwell has associated with him in the business of Photographing, Mr. F. Ellsworth, who has lately arrived from the East. Mr. Desmond, who has earned a first-class reputation as an operator, will continue with the new firm. Read their card in another column.” The Daily Herald, (Portland) 12 April 1866 pg. 3, col. 2

“CARDWELL PHOTOGRAPHIC GALLERY, 89 First. Street, between Washington and Alder, Portland, Oregon. This old and well-known GALLERY & MUSEUM, having passed into the hands of the present proprietors, with additional new Stock and Material, they are now prepared to execute in the very highest style of the Art, Mammoth Photographs, Cartes de Visite, Ambrotypes, Melainotypes, In fact every style of picture of the ‘human face divine’. The services of the distinguished operator and artist Mr. R. A. Desmond, have been secured, which announcement is sufficient for the customers of this establishment. A cordial invitation to our friends, and the public generally is hereby extended to visit us, when we will use our best efforts to please. ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL, proprietors Cardwell Photographic Gallery, 89 First Street.” The Daily Herald, (Portland) 12 April 1866 pg. 3 (first insertion)

“FINE PICTURES- Ellsworth & Cardwell continue to take the lead in PHOTOGRAPHS, ALBUM and VISITING CARDS, AMBROTYPES, etc., at the Cardwell Gallery, 89 First Street, above Washington. The celebrated artist, Mr. Desmond, superintends the operating room. Persons may sit at any time from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.” Oregonian 13 – 18 April 1866

“A TRUE PICTURE- By calling on ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL at the CARDWELL PHOTOGRAPHIC GALLERY, 89 First Street, persons may get the MOST BEAUTIFUL as well as the MOST LIFE-LIKE PICTURE of themselves in this country. A single trial of the skill of MR. DESMOND, the distinguished Operator, will completely convince the most skeptical.” Oregonian 24 April 1866

“FACIAL EXPRESSION.- ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL at their gallery, 89 First Street, can show, and are now taking the most superb CARD PICTURES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AMBROTYPES, MELAINOTYPES, etc. Mr. Desmond is the Operator at this Establishment and stands without a rival here or elsewhere.” Oregonian 25 April 1866

There are three more months of similar daily advertising, which is not being included in this book.

“THE HUMAN FACE – What vast expression there is in the human face. Julius Caesar, Napoleon, Washington, Jackson, Grant, and other great generals possessed nobility of features both on and off the field of battle to a wonderful degree. To get the features in repose and beauty by Photography you must go to ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL’S GALLERY, 89 First St.” Oregonian 1-5 August 1866

“PICTURE FACT – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First Street, received by the last steamer an order from a gentleman with a prominent mercantile house (and a well known citizen of San Francisco) from which the following is an extract: ‘Please send me, by Wells, Fargo & Co., another dozen of those vignettes, and oblige yours,’ &c. As the writer is an excellent judge of photographic work and the fine arts, his letter to the above firm proved, beyond a doubt, that they can produce equal, if not superior, pictures at their gallery here to those coming from the first class establishment of the California metropolis.” Oregonian 7-8 August 1866

“ATLANTIC CABLE – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First Street, Have received no dispatch yet from Her Majesty, Queen Victoria, but it is presumed she is interested to know that they continue to furnish the most BEAUTIFUL PHOTOGRAPHS, in this section of the United States. Visitors to this GALLERY will please mention this fact in their dispatches to the Court of St. James.” Oregonian 14-15 August 1866

“PICTURE CONVENTION – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First Street, expects to hold a convention at their Photograph Gallery solely for the public good. Delegates from all parts of this State and the adjoining Territories arrive daily and present their faces to the above firm, which does away with the credentials and proxy business. The people at large are always welcome.” Oregonian 17-18 August 1866

“PICTURE COMMITTEE – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First Street, have been awarded a favorable report and the highest eulogies for the finest photographs and pictures of all kinds by the committee selected from the people at large. This of course settles all questions of quality and superiority. The gallery and museum continues to attract all classes.” Oregonian 21 August 1866 pg. 3 col. 4

“PICTURE VERDICT – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First Street, have received the verdict which pronounces that the Photographs, Sun Pearls, etc. from this Gallery are the finest ever produced on the Pacific coast. This accords with the opinion of transient residents, judges of art who always visit this establishment during their short stay. This firm are prepared to meet all demands in the picture line.” Oregonian 23-25 August 1866

“PHOTOGRAPHIC DIAMONDS – Ellsworth & Cardwell at their Gallery, 89 First Street, lead all others in the production of every kind of PICTURE and hold the same rank in the photographic art as the diamond, ruby, topaz, onyx, and emerald do among the precious gems. Within the last few days, this establishment has executed some specimens of exquisite workmanship and is fully prepared to hold its position at the front without fear of successful competition.” Oregonian 29 August 1866

“AUTUMNAL SHOWER – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First Street, would respectfully announce, that the present refreshing, beautiful shower of rain does not at all prevent them from taking those ELEGANT PHOTOGRAPHS, or, in fact, any kind of FIRST CLASS PICTURE. This Gallery is noted for its superb work even during the most unfavorable weather.” Oregonian 31 August 1866 pg. 2 col. 2

“GOLDEN SHIMMER – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First Street, use the purest gold in developing those CARTES DE VISITE, SUN PEARLS, and other productions of the photographic art. This is one of the few things which give tone to the PICTURES, as well as to the GALLERY of those gentlemen.The establishments of the Eastern States of San Francisco do not now pretend to surpass this in any department of the business.” Oregonian 5 September 1866 pg. 2 col. 3

“RAREST OF THE RARE – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First Street, have shown us some of their enameled photographic card pictures which are strikingly beautiful. This is the only gallery where can be obtained a specimen of this patented improvement of the art. Other kind (sic) of Pictures, such as SUN PEARLES, PEARL AMBROTYPES, PLAIN PHOTOGRAPHS, etc., furnished as usual.” Oregonian 10-11 September 1866 pg. 2 col. 3

“SILVER SHEEN – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First Street, Have succeeded in producing a photograph picture combining all those beautiful shades and effects which render them so superior to all others. The fact that this firm is now filling orders for pictures from San Francisco and all parts of this State and adjoining Territories tells the story. The kind of work executed at this gallery commends itself to all.” Oregonian 7 September 1866 pg. 2 col. 3

“THE PICTURE GALLERY – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First Street, take the FINEST PICTURES, and have the gallery par excellence, on the Pacific Coast, outside of San Francisco. And even that city, with all its wealth and facilities for doing business, cannot boast of a Photographic Establishment that can surpass this one for ARTISTIC STYLE and FINISH. Everything known to the Art executed in a FIRST CLASS manner.” Oregonian 15 September 1866

“NOTA BENE – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First Street, continue to attract public attention to their MAGNIFICENT PHOTOGRAPHS, CARTES DE VISITE, SUN PEARLS, ENAMELED CARD PICTURES, etc. the truth is this is the only GALLERY where you can get the genuine production of the art. This firm have lately received from New York some beautiful stereoscopic views of the White Mountains and vicinity.” Oregonian 17-19 September 1866 pg. 2 col. 3

“SPOTLESS – Ellsworth & Cardwell Photograph Gallery, 89 First Street, is the place to get those SPOTLESS SUN PEARLS, CARD PICTURES, PEARL AMBROTYPES, etc, etc. Experience tells us that ‘The best are always the cheapest’ which accounts for the large number of sitters who daily visit this Establishment. Pictures taken equally well in sunny or cloudy weather.” Oregonian 20-22 September 1866

“THE WONDERS OF PHOTOGRAPHY – Ellsworth & Cardwell, at their GALLERY, 89 First street, have shown us some of the most exquisite specimens of the Photographic Art ever executed here. Among the various styles seen at this establishment we might mention those magnificent and delicate toned SUN PEARLS, those superb PATENT ENAMELED PICTURES, those artistic ALBUM and VISITING CARDS, as well as PEARL AMBROTYPES, MELAINOTYPES, etc. All who value fine work will visit this Gallery without delay.” Oregonian, September 24-25 1866

“LOOK UPON THIS PICTURE’ Etc. – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First Street, invite the public to call and examine those beautiful PICTURES on exhibition at their GALLERY. The MUSEUM attached to this establishment contains many curiosities of the Taxidermist’s skill, and the Mineral Department is full of Geological Wonders.” Oregonian 27-29 September 1866 Oregonian 27-29 September 1866

“THE ART AMONG THE ANCIENTS – recent researches among the ruins of Pompeii (sic) and Herculaum have led some writers to think that the inhabitants of those ruined cities knew something of PHOTOGRAPHS. Whether this is so or not the most brilliant results are being brought out of the art at the present day, at the GALLERY of ELLSWORTH AND CARDWELL, 89 First Street, may be seen some exquisite gems in the PICTURE line that are unapproachable as works of art. We would advise those who wish to adorn their parlors and albums in a tasteful manner to give those gentlemen a call.” Oregonian 1-3 October 1866

“ELEGANT PICTURES- Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First street, are astonishing the art world and public generally with the most beautiful SUN PEARLS, CARD PHOTOGRAPHS, Crayons, Ambrotypes, etc. It is useless now to go or send to San Francisco or New York for fine work, as this GALLERY can furnish every style known to the art equally as good. Very young children should be brought before 12 o’clock.” Oregonian, 4-6 October 1866

“THE MORNING DEW DROP – Those splendid SUN PEARLS we saw at ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL’S GALLERY, 89 First street, the other day, are as fresh and rosy as the surface of a dew drop in the rays of the morning sunlight. All of the various styles of PICTURES known to the art are procurable at any time from this establishment.” Oregonian, 9-10 October 1866

“PURE AS CRYSTAL – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First street, finish SUN PEARLS, all styles of PHOTOGRAPHS, and every kind of PICTURE with tone equalling the pure crystal. This GALLERY excels all others for excellent work. A few passe partouts frames for PORCELAIN PICTURES arrived on the steamship Pacific.” Oregonian, 11-13 October 1866

“THE PLACE – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First street, is the place to get the finest SUN PEARLS, the finest PHOTOGRAPHS, the finest VIGNETTES – in fact ALL of the latest and finest productions of the art. We saw some magnificent specimens in those passe partouts frames which those gentlemen have recently imported. They are perfectly splendid and will no doubt be in demand by those who delight in the beautiful.” Oregonian, 15-17 October 1866

“ARTISTIC BEAUTY – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First street, are embellishing the albums of the country with the most BEAUTIFUL PICTURES, while the parlor and drawing-room walls of our citizens are adorned with the most elegant specimens of the photographic art – from this GALLERY. The advantage of having work done at a FIRST CLASS GALLERY like the above is hardly necessary now to urge.” Oregonian, 18-20 October 1866

“PICTURES AT THE FAIR – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First street, sent no PICTURES to the State Fair this year. Those we saw there are not equal to those beautiful SUN PEARLS, PEARL AMBROTYPES, etc., which are daily produced at this GALLERY. As these gentlemen did not contend for a premium, the fact of anyone getting it will have no weight as to superiority. The public seem (sic) to be satisfied where to obtain the best. Pictures taken equally well under a cloudy or clear day.” Oregonian, 23-24 October 1866

“WONDERS OF ART – ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL 89 Front Street, have produced lately some of the MOST BEAUTIFUL SPECIMENS of the PHOTOGRAPHIC ART. Even those who have seen the finest productions in other parts of the world, give way to expressions of delight while viewing the pictures from this gallery. This establishment stands without a rival.” Oregonian, 26-29 October 1866

“ARTEMUS WARD – ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL 89 Front Street, have just learned that the old joker is now in London, contributing articles to Punch and being lionized generally. It is presumed that in his wanderings he does not forget the fact that the gentlemen whose names commence this paragraph still furnish the public with the most beautiful SUN PEARLS, and all other kinds of PICTURES.” Oregonian, 26-29 October 1866

“LOVELY PEARLS – ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL 89 Front Street, Have recently added some beautiful SUN PEARLS to their collection, and continue as usual to lead all others for fine PHOTOGRAPHS, ALBUM PICTURES, CARTES DE VISITE, MELAINOTYPES, etc. The excellence of the work done at this GALLERY receives the daily approbation of the public. The weather makes no difference in taking a picture.” Oregonian, 1-3 November 1866

“NO CARDS – When those words are added to a marriage notice, they must not be understood as meaning that the happy couple have not visited the PICTURE GALLERY of ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL 89 Front Street, and obtained a dozen of those SPLENDID CARD PICTURES, for which these gentlemen are so justly celebrated. Children should be brought in the forenoon.” Oregonian, 4-7 November 1866

“NICE – ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL 89 Front Street, notwithstanding the sifting rain, continue to exercise those magnificent PHOTOGRAPHIC PICTURES, which excel all others for beauty and durability. Chemistry has demonstrated the fact, and the proprietors of this establishment possess the secret, that pictures can be taken just as well whether it rains or shines. The public will please bear this in mind.” Oregonian, 8-10 November 1866

“WHERE SHALL WE GO FOR PICTURES? TO ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL 89 Front Street, of course. It is the only place where you are sure of being pleased. Everything emanating from this Gallery possesses the peculiar charm of attracting the attention of the most unsophisticated observer. All classes of the community visit this institution daily. SUN PEARLS, ALBUM CARDS, MELAINOTYPES, and every other style executed in the most superior manner.” Oregonian, 12-14 November 1866

“GET THE BEST – ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL 89 Front Street, furnish the very best PHOTOGRAPHS, SUN PEARLS, and every other kind of PICTURE known to the art. It is believed that the ancient Druids understood something of fine arts, but it has remained for this establishment to show its real beauties in fixing the features of the human face. It is not necessary to wait for a clear day.” Oregonian, 15-17 November 1866

“THE GALAXY – ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL 89 Front Street, have the largest collection of notable pictures in Oregon. This firm are executing, daily, those exquisite SUN PEARLS, splendid CARTES DE VISITE, or ALBUM PICTURES, etc., etc. At this GALLERY may be seen some of the restored artistic beauty found in the ruined palaces of the Incas.” Oregonian, 19-21 November 1866

“TUSCAN-SHADED. ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL 89 Front Street, produce the most elegant PICTURES of the present day. The camera obscura at this GALLERY is the ‘glass of fashion’, and truly reveals the ‘mould of form’. Some of the specimens we saw here lately look as though they were continuously fanned by a passing nephyr. We don’t know how it is but these gentlemen understand the art of ‘superb finishing’. Negatives taken in all kinds of weather.” Oregonian, 23-24 November 1866

“FOAM OF THE SEA – ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL 89 Front Street (Post Office block) are stunning the public gaze with those BEAUTIFUL PICTURES taken during the past rainy week. This is the only establishment where all specimens of the PHOTOGRAPHIC ART are produced equally well in any kind of weather. CARTES DE VISITE, AMBROTYPES, MELAINOTYPES, etc., furnished as usual to the patrons of this gallery.” Oregonian, 26-28 November 1866

“THE SPHINX – ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL 89 First Street (Post Office block) have just received information that by an imperial order, artists are engaged in taking photographic views of the Egyptian Sphinx, the Pyramids, and other relics of antiquity. Of course the firm are not geographically situated to obtain views of existing monuments of that wonderful people who flourished three thousand years before the Christian era, but they are fully able to execute the most BEAUTIFUL PICTURES of the human face and form. SUN PEARLS, CARDS, and all other styles taken in any kind of weather.” Oregonian, 1 December 1866

“PHOTOGRAPHIC NEWS – To get the best, go to ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL’S GALLERY (Post Office block) 89 First Street, they furnish the most elegant SUN PEARL, the most superb CARTE DE VISITE, the finest large PHOTOGRAPH, the brightest MELAINOTYPE, AMBROTYPE, or any other style known to the art. Work from this establishment holds rank with that of any other on the continent. Negatives taken during any kind of weather. Children should be brought in the forenoon.” Oregonian, 3-5 December 1866

“WHAT STYLE OF PICTURE – By going to ELLSWORTH 7 CARDWELL’S GALLERY, 89 First Street (Post office block) you can easily decide the above query. Modern Photography has taken immense strides since the time of the immortal Daguerre. At this Establishment are produced, and may be seen, the most valuable improvements of the Photographic art. PICTURES from this GALLERY are beyond all question the finest ever taken on this portion of the Pacific slope, Negatives made in any kind of weather.” Oregonian, 7-8 December 1866

“MOONOTYPES – ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL (Post Office block) 89 First Street, are informed that Prof. Draper, of New York, has again succeeded in obtaining another photograph of the moon. This remarkable occurrence exhibit -on of the wonders of the art. While the most scientific men of the age are engaged in great photographic experiments, the above gentlemen continue in the front rank as PICTURE takers. Evidence of this can be seen at all hours, at their GALLERY.” Oregonian, 10-12 December 1866

“HOLIDAYS – ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL 89 First Street (Post Office block) are executing some BEAUTIFUL PICTURES for the coming Holidays. As this firm have several engagements now, it would be well for those wishing SUN PEARLS, CARTES DE VISITE, etc., to call at once and have their orders filled. Children should be brought in before 12 o’clock. Negatives taken in all kinds of weather.” Oregonian, 13-14 December 1866

“PICTURE NOTICE – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 Front street (Post office block) would notify those wanting pictures that unless they call at their PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY before the first of January, it is not likely they will again have the opportunity for first-class work in this city. A word to the wise is sufficient. SUN PEARLS, ALBUM CARDS, and other styles executed in same superior manner as heretofore.” Oregonian, 17-19 December 1866

“TIS WELL – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 Front street (Post office block) would again call attention to the fact, that unless those persons wanting PICTURES call at their GALLERY before January 1st, they will be sure to regret it. The distinguished operator of this establishment leaves this city after New Year’s Day, and all those who desire SUN PEARLS, CARTES DE VISITE, AMBROTYPES, etc., in the very first style of the art should go at once. Negatives taken in all kinds of weather.” Oregonian, 20-22 December 1866

“MERRY CHRISTMAS AND HAPPY NEW YEAR – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 Front street (Post office block) would call attention to the fact that it is customary to present those you call on New Year’s Day with your PICTURE. Now those who are not supplied with CARTES DE VISITE, AMBROTYPES, SUN PEARLS, and other specimens of PHOTOGRAPHIC ART would do well to CALL AT THEIR GALLERY at once. Negatives taken in all kinds of weather.” Oregonian, 24 December 1866 – 1 January 1867

1867: Buchtel announces he is proprietor of the old Buchtel & Cardwell gallery. See Buchtel for text of this announcement. Oregonian, 21 January 1867.

1870: “Revenue Divisons. – … the division of this Internal Revenue District, with the names and address of the Assistant Assessors and number of the division… 4. B. P. Cardwell, Dalles – Baker, Grant, Union, Umatilla, and Wasco <counties>.” Roseburg Ensign (Roseburg), 26 November 1870 pg. 2, col. 6.

1886: “THE MECHANICS FAIR…(judges include B. P. Cardwell and J. R. Cardwell)” Oregonian, 17 October 1886, pg. 5, col. 3.

1887: “Personnel of the Pioneers (pioneers reunion in Portland)… 1852…Dr. J. R. Cardwell, Portland – Illinois,…B. P. Cardwell, Portland – Illinois…” Oregonian, 16 June 1887 pg. 3, col. 4.

1890: report of complex legal case involving how Police Commissioners are elected … “That the said B. P. Cardwell was elected as one of said police commissioners under said section seventy-two, on the third Monday in June, 1887, and was duly commissioned as such police commissioner for the term of three years from the first Monday in July, 1887. …” Oregonian, 26 August 1890, pg. 5, col. 3

1897: list of Oregon pioneers in attendance at reunion and parade in Portland, “1852 (year of arrival in Oregon)…B. P. Cardwell…” Weekly Oregonian, 18 June, 1897, pg. 4, col. 5

1903: “B. P. CARDWELL, OF CITY COUNCIL, DEAD. COUNCILMAN B. P. CARDWELL died at his home, 395 Fourth street, at 1:15 o’clock this afternoon. He has been ill for some time with a complaint of the liver.

  1. P. Cardwell was born in Springfield, Ill., in 1832. He came of old Virginian stock and was a blood relative of Gen. Robert E. Lee. He crossed the plains in 1852 over the old government trail, and located at Marysville, now Corvallis, which at that time was the head of navigation on the Willamette river. He started a pack train to the mines of Southern Oregon. After four years he sold out this business and took up a homestead on what is now known as Cardwell hills. He was an extensive raiser of stock for several years and came to Portland in ’58, and went into the photographing business with Joseph Buchtel.

In 1861 he was appointed by President Lincoln to be collector of internal revenue for the district of Oregon. This position he held for 21 years, when he resigned in ’72, and was appointed a police commissioner by Governor Moody. In the early eighties he served a term in the Oregon legislature. He has always been a staunch Republican and been identified with public life.

Two years ago he was elected councilman-at-large. He leaves a widow whom he married in 1856, when she was Miss Clark, an Indian missionary. His brothers are Dr. J. B. Cardwell, a dentist; Charles Cardwell, a farmer, living south of the city, and R. H. Cardwell, a business man of San Francisco. His only child is Dr. H. W. Cardwell, in the Abington block.” Oregon Journal, 26 November 1903, pg. 2, col. 1.

1903: “BYRON P. CARDWELL DIES. PROMINENT PIONEER AND COUNCILMAN PASSES AWAY. Held Office as Deputy Collector Internal Revenue, Police Commissioner and Representative. Byron Perrin Cardwell, an Oregon pioneer of 1852, and one of Portland’s most widely known citizens, died at his home at 395 Fourth street, at 1:15 o’clock yesterday afternoon. In August he was stricken with heart trouble, which resulted in his death.

Byron Perrin Cardwell was born in Springfield, Ill., March 3, 1832. He was the son of William Lee and Mary Ann Biddle Cardwell, both of Virginia.

At the age of 20 he accompanied his parents to Oregon, driving his own ox-team across the plains, and arriving at Marysville, now known as Corvallis, on October 8, 1852. The family took up donation land claims on what is now called Cardwell Hill, and Byron Cardwell raised blooded horses and cattle in partnership with his uncle, the late Hamilton Campbell.

With the late W. B. Carter he drove a large pack string of mules between Corvallis, Yreka, Cal., and Jacksonville, Or., for several years. In 1856 he married to Miss Abbie M. Clarke. In 1858 he moved to Portland and formed a partnership with Joseph Buchtel in the photograph business, which continued until he was appointed a Deputy Collector of Internal Revenue by President Lincoln about 1861.

He remained in this position until removed by President Cleveland under the celebrated ‘offensive partisanship’ order, after having served 21 years. During much of this time transportation facilities were nil, and he traveled over the state of Oregon from border to border on horseback, collecting taxes in gold dust and carrying it in saddle bags until some Wells-Fargo office was reached. He was a man of fine physique, a strong and daring rider, a splendid pistol shot, and reported to be absolutely devoid of fear.

It was his boast that he never lost a cent of Government money, but he had many exciting adventures with highwaymen, who thought Uncle Sam’s money fair prey.

Since 1895 he has devoted himself to private investments. He was a life-long Republican, and an earnest worker for the party’s success.

During Governor Moody’s administration he was appointed Police Commissioner for Portland, and by successive re-elections by the people remained as such for nine years. In 1894 he was elected a member of the State Legislature. At the last election he was compelled by a committee of citizens to accept the seat in the City Council for the Fifth Ward.

His religion was the golden rule, and it is doubtful if he had a personal enemy on earth. He was a man of the strictest business integrity, and his ‘word was as good as his bond.’

He is survived by his wife and his son, Dr. Herbert W.; by three brothers, Dr. James R. and Charles H. of this city and Richard H. Cardwell of San Francisco, and by two sisters, Ms. Olena M. Murray and Mrs. Martha A. Dalton. The late Dr. William B. Cardwell and the late Mrs. George E. Cole were his brother and sister. A daughter, Alice, died in 1863.” Oregonian, 27 November 1903, pg. 10, col. 3. includes portrait.

1903: “FATTY DEGENERATION KILLED B. P. CARDWELL. A post-mortem was held on the body of B. P. Cardwell this forenoon by Drs. Wilson, Glesy and Chalmers, which showed the cause of death to have been fatty degeneration of the heart and gravel in the gall-bladder. The funeral will take place at 1:30 p. m. Sunday from the <illegible word>, 394 Fourth street. Interment is at Lone Fir cemetery. Mayor Williams today appointed the following active pall bearers from the various city departments for the funeral of Councilman B. P. Cardwell: From the city council Councilmen Rumlin, Bentley, Albee and Sigler. From the executive board- W. Fleidner and Sig Sichel. Treasurer J. E. Weriein and City Auditor T. C. Devlin. The obsequies will be held from the family residence 395 Fourth street, on Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock. The city officials will attend as a body.” Oregon Journal, 27 November 1903, pg. 7, col. 2.

Bibliography

Brown, Robert O., Nineteenth Century Portland, Oregon Photographers: A Collector’s Handbook (author; Portland, 1991) pg. 4, 5, 19, 20, 52, 53, 55, 85, 91-93.

Hines, Harvey, An Illustrated History of The State Of Oregon, Chicago; Lewis Publishing Co, 1893 pg. 584-585 “B. P. Cardwell is an Oregon pioneer of 1852, who, during the administration of Abraham Lincoln in 1864, became connected with the Internal Revenue Department of Oregon, and for twenty-one consecutive years performed prompt and faithful service to his State and country. He was born upon the farm near Springfield, Illinois, in 1832 …(account of family ancestry, childhood, and overland emigration to Oregon)…

On his arrival our subject began work with his uncle, Hamilton Campbell, residing in Marion county, and a pioneer of 1839, who came to the State with Jason Lee, of missionary fame; with him our subject remained until 1853, then went to Corvallis, and with Samuel Alexander engaged in the mercantile business, which was continued about one year, when they sold out their stock, purchased a small pack train and began packing from Corvallis to Jacksonville and Yreka mines. Purchasing their own stock of flour, butter and miners’ supplies, and then selling to merchants or miners. This was carried on with profit for about eighteen months, when they sold the train to B. F. Dowell, who was fitting out an escort to protect the incoming immigrants from the Indians.

Mr. Cardwell then purchased a claim in connection with W. B. Carter of Benton county, a pioneer of 1852, and together they engaged in the stock business, which was followed until 1859, when subject sold his interest and stock and came to Portland, and the photographic firm of Buchtel & Cardwell was then organized, with galleries located at Salem, Corvallis, Astoria and the Dalles. They carried on a large and lucrative business for about five years, when Mr. Cardwell sold his interest and retired from the firm.

In September, 1864, Mr. Cardwell was appointed, under President Lincoln’s administration, Assistant Assessor and Deputy collector of Internal Revenue for the District of Oreton, and remained in that capacity until July, 1885, when, with the changed administration, resignations were in order and accepted. Mr. Cardwell then formed a partnership with B. E. Lippincott to engage in the real estate and custom-house brokerage business, which is still continued.

He was married in Benton county in 1856, to Miss Abbie M. Clark, daughter of William Clark, of South Hadley, Massachusetts, who emigrated to Oregon in 1852. Mr. and Mrs. Cardwell have one child, Herbert W., a graduate of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of New York city, and now a physician in the city of Portland.

Mr. Cardwell still resides in the old home, on the corner of Fourth and Harrison streets, which he established in 1860. For seven years he has been on the Board of Police Commissioners, first appointed by Governor Z. F. Moody, and subsequently elected by the Republican party. He was one of the incorporators and is president of Lone Fir Cemetery, also vice-president of Ancient Order Building Association, member of A. O. U. W., and stockholder and director of the Union Banking Company. He is actively interested in all enterprises which tend toward the growth and development of his State and city.”

Park, Harriet Word, Marriage Records of Multnomah County, Oregon 1855-1873, Portland; Genealogical Forum 1973 pg. 40. Mr. Frank Dalton of Lewiston, W. T., and Mrs. Martha A. Barngert of Multnomah County, married 24 July 1866, at the house of Mrs. Cardwell by G. H. Atkinson, Minister of the Gospel; witnesses Byron Cardwell, S. M. Parish, and others. Page 46 in Marriage Records Book 1 Jan 1855 to Aug 1865 at Multnomah County Courthouse. <author’s note- M. A. Dalton was the daughter of W. L. Cardwell, he was the brother of Byron P. and James R. Cardwell>

Hines, Harvey, An Illustrated History of The State Of Oregon, Chicago; Lewis Publishing Co, 1893 pg. 604-605 (Biography of J. R. Cardwell) “…Being a taxidermist and something of an ornithologist, he made the first collection of the birds and animals of the Willamette valley…”

Genealogical files in Oregon Historical Society.

Scrapbook of James R. Cardwell, Oregon Historical Society, Scrapbook No. 131.

 

 

Cardwell, J. R.

Ellsworth, Frank

Buchtel & Cardwell

Ellsworth & Cardwell

Chronology

1859-1865 Portland (Buchtel & Cardwell)

1866 Cardwell Gallery

April 19, 1866-January 1, 1867 Cardwell & Ellsworth

Employee Listings

Desmond, R. A. Mr., operator 1866

A substantial amount of confusion exists about the four Cardwells mentioned in this book. To summarize briefly, Buchtel and B. P. Cardwell opened a photograph studio in 1859. A brother of Byron, J. R. Cardwell opened a dental operation in this same building, next to Buchtel and Cardwell’s gallery. In 1864 J. R. Cardwell may have acquired the interest of B. P. Cardwell and entered the partnership with Buchtel. The third, R. H. Cardwell, was another brother who briefly had a Portland studio but moved to Seattle and then to Astoria. Also Buchtel shared a building with W. B. Cardwell, surgeon, at First and Morrison in 1876.

Please also see Joseph Buchtel, Hamilton Campbell, Frank Dalton, R. H. Cardwell, R. A. Desmond.

Byron P. Cardwell arrived in Oregon in 1852 at age 20. He probably learned photography from his uncle, Hamilton Campbell, an itinerant daguerreotypist from Corvallis. In 1859 Campbell moved to San Francisco to be a photographer, and Cardwell may have moved to Portland to work with Buchtel at this time. Buchtel knew Campbell, having worked on his boat in 1853.

From 1859-1864 B. P. Cardwell had a partnership with Joseph Buchtel. The reader is refereed to the Buchtel biography for information about Cardwell during their partnership. In 1864, B. P. Cardwell was appointed Assistant Assessor and Deputy Collector of Internal Revenue for the District of Oregon.

It appears that J. R. Cardwell, the dentist, bought the partnership share of his brother. 1864 advertising names J. R. Cardwell as the active partner. The Buchtel & Cardwell partnership continued operating under that name until early 1865.

On 10 January 1865, the Oregonian announced the Buchtel & Cardwell gallery had sold out. J. R. Cardwell announced that the Cardwell gallery was open for business at the old address. Buchtel soon announced he was an operator in A. B. Woodard’s gallery. The dissolution of the Buchtel & Cardwell’s partnership had left Cardwell in an advantageous position, controlling the well known studio location in Shelby’s building. Also Cardwell was able to keep R. A. Desmond, their chief photographer. Desmond, an employee of Brady’s gallery, had moved to Portland from New York and accepted a job as operator with Buchtel & Cardwell in March of 1864. He is spoken of very highly in contemporary reports, and there is little doubt he was an important asset to Cardwell’s enterprise.

On 2 March 1865, J. R. Cardwell announced he had sold the Gallery to F. Dalton. Dalton is one of the few Oregon photographers I have seen who used a date stamp on each photograph he made, making the tracking of the galley substantially easier. Desmond continued as the operator of Dalton’s gallery. (See Dalton, Frank in this book)

On 23 November 1865, J. R. Cardwell announced he had bought F. Dalton out, and that the Cardwell gallery was open, with R. A. Desmond as operator.

On April 19, 1866, Cardwell announced that he had a new firm, Cardwell & Ellsworth. His new partner was photographer Frank Ellsworth, who relocated to Portland from the east for this enterprise. R. A. Desmond is still advertised as their operator.

The natural history museum adjacent to the Buchtel and Cardwell’s gallery, which was mostly J. R. Cardwell’s, remained an advertised attraction through the Cardwell and Ellsworth partnership. J. R. Cardwell was an amateur taxidermist, and had won first premium at the 1861 and 1862 State Fairs. This exhibit appears to have been Portland’s first museum.

In the fall of 1866, Ellsworth & Cardwell launched an advertising campaign in the Oregonian, writing new ad copy every three days. These advertisements probably did them more harm than good, due to the ludicrous style of the copywriter. The comedy of analogies and crude attempts at cleverness are frequently a thinly veiled attack on Buchtel, who had announced the opening of his new studio on August 25th. Two months later, the newspapers announced Buchtel was awarded first premium for photography at the 1866 Oregon State Fair, and Ellsworth and Cardwell responded “Ellsworth & Cardwell sent no pictures to the State Fair this year. Those we saw there are not equal to those…which are produced at this Gallery. As these gentlemen did not contend for a premium, the fact of anyone getting it will have no weight as to superiority…”. Buchtel’s reply bristled in the next day’s paper that “his work stands for itself and does not require bombastic puffs in self written cards to recommend itself to the public”.

On December 17th Ellsworth & Cardwell announced that they were going out of business effective January 1, 1867. This was probably the result of a deal with Buchtel, who had left for San Francisco on December 13th to buy new studio equipment. Buchtel, who had only occupied his new Front and Morrison gallery for 4 months, announced his move back into the Shelby building gallery on January 21, 1867.

The 1866 advertisements provide a glimpse into Ellsworth & Cardwell’s operation. They offered to produce ambrotypes, sun pearls, mammoth photographs, ferrotypes, crayons, vignettes, life size photographs, and CDVs, plain or enameled. They also retailed stereo cards made by a New York firm. Their prices were below Buchtel’s. There is no indication they photographed anything other than studio portraits and copy work.

Artifacts

The Oregon Historical Society has a CDV portrait of Byron Cardwell (OHS 209 A-3), and a second image of him posing with Buchtel.

Photograph of Theodore Riggs, CDV vignette head shot, on unmarked mount with ms. note “Taken at Cardwell’s Gallery, Portland, Oregon, February 6, 1866” (Stanley Hess)

Directory Listings

1863 PD pg. 21 “Buchtel & Cardwell, artists, 87 First”, pg. 23 “Cardwell, B. P., (Buchtel & Cardwell) artist, 87 First St., res NW cor Harrison and Fourth.”, plus display ad pg. 22 quoted in full under Buchtel’s listing in this book.

1864 PD pg. 39 “Cardwell, B. P. Photographer, res NW corner fourth.”, “Buchtel & Cardwell, Photographers, rooms 89 First” Ellsworth not listed.

1865 PD pg. 37 “Buchtel & Cardwell, Photograph gallery, 89 First St.”, pg. 41 “Cardwell, B. P., photographer res NW cor Fourth”, photograph galleries pg. 97 “Cardwell, J. R., 89 First.”, (plus display ad quoted below) Ellsworth not listed

1867 West Coast pg. 281 Portland “Ellsworth & Cardwell, photographers 89 First”

1866 PD pg. 41 “Cardwell, B. P., photographer, res cor Fourth and Harrison”, pg. 47 “Ellsworth, Frank, res cor Fifth and Morrison with W. G. West.” (W. G. West was a messenger for Wells, Fargo & Co.)

1867 PD pg. 41 “Cardwell, Byron P, Photograph Artist, res cor Fourth and Harrison.”, “Cardwell J. R., dentist, 89 First, res 235 Second.”, pg. 49 “Ellsworth, Frank (Cardwell & Ellsworth) photograph gallery, 89 First, bds N s Washington bet Third and Fourth.”, pg. 47 “Desmond, operator at Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First, bds cor B and First”

1868 PD pg. 41 “Cardwell, Byron P., Deputy U. S. Internal Revenue Collector, res cor Fourth and Harrison.”, “Cardwell, J. R., dentist, 89 First, res 233 Second.” (also listed is Richard H. Cardwell, photographer, please see separate listing)

1869 PD pg. 43 “Cardwell, Byron, res cor Fourth and Harrison”, “Cardwell, J. R., dentist, office 89 First.”, “Cardwell, W. B., physician, office 89 First.”

1871 PD not listed

1872 PD pg. 53 “Cardwell, J. R., dentist, 89 First”

1880 PD pg. 87 “Cardwell, B. P., deputy collector Internal Revenue, res 395 Fourth”, “Cardwell, J. R., Dentist, office rm 4 Dekum’s building, res 235 Second”

1881 PD pg. 92 “Cardwell, B. P., department collector Internal Revenue, res 395 Fourth, n w cor Harrison”, “Cardwell, J. R., Dentist, 115 First, cor Washington, res w q cor Second and Columbia”

Directory listings continue throughout their lives.

Photographer’s Imprints

“Ellsworth & Cardwell, Portland,—-Oregon” CDV printed back (tr)

“Ellsworth & Cardwell, Cardwell Gallery, 89 First Street. Portland, Oregon” CDV printed back (OHS)

News Items and Advertisements

The reader is refereed to Joseph Buchtel for Buchtel and Cardwell ads.

1852: “List of Letters remaining in the Post Office at Salem, O. T., June 30, A.. D., 1852 … Cardwell, B. P.” Oregon Statesman (Salem) 10 July 1852, pg. 3, col. 2.

1856: “MARRIED – In Corvallis, at the residence of Hon. G. E. Cole, on the evening of April 32d, by the Rev. W. F. Boyakin, Mr. Byron P. Cardwell, formerly of Jacksonville, Ill., to Miss Abbie M. Clark, formerly of South Hadlay, Mass.” Oregon Argus, (Oregon City) 12 April 1856. pg. 3, col. 3. (see Wakefield for information about an 1852 daguerreotype of Abbie Clark) (item courtesy of Michael Cirelli)

1863: (List of jurors) “The Grand Jury consisting of…B. P. Cardwell…was sworn in…” Oregonian, 9 March 1863, pg. 3, col. 1

1863: “J. R. Cardwell, Surgeon Dentist…Has permanently located in Portland…Office adjoining Buchtel & Cardwell’s Picture Gallery…” Oregonian, 11 July 1863

1864: “Multnomah County Union Convention…South Portland…B. P. Cardwell” Oregonian, 14 March 1864, pg. 2 col. 2.

1864: “Notice to the Public. Notice is hereby given that the special Income Tax under the U. S. Internal Revenue Law. of the act of Congress approved June 30th, 1864, for Division No. 4, is now open for examination at my office in Salem, Marion county, for ten days from date. No change of assessment will be allowed after the expiration of the ten days. Byron Cardwell, Assistant Assessor, 4th Division, Salem, Nov. 11, 1864” Oregon Statesman, (Salem) 14 November 1864 pg. 2, col. 7

1865: “SOLD OUT – The photograph gallery on Front street which has been conducted for a long term of years by Messrs. Buchtel & Cardwell, has changed into the proprietorship of other parties. The collection of rare species of birds, animals, reptiles, etc., which forms an attractive cabinet of curiosities in natural history, has made this the finest resort in the State, and the name of the old firm have been synonymist (sic) on the part of naming and preserving the relics which have been entrusted or donated to them.” Oregonian, 10 January 1865, pg. 3, col. 1.

1865: “100,000 MEN WANTED – To sit for cards de visite, ambrotypes, life sized photographs, &c., &c., in all the latest styles

The undersigned having refitted and refurbished the old Gallery of BUCHTEL & CARDWELL, No. 89 First street, Portland, and engaged the services of MR. DESMOND, of Wm. Shew’s Gallery, San Francisco, of whom Mr. Shew says in his letter of recommendation, ‘I think he possesses all the requisite qualifications of a FIRST CLASS OPERATOR, and has the best practical knowledge of Photographic Chemistry of any man in California,’ the undersigned proposes to take One Hundred Thousand Pictures this season.

Cards will be delivered with all possible dispatch. Children will be taken in the twinkling of an eye. The public are respectfully invited to call and satisfy themselves that he is prepared to compete with any Gallery on the Pacific Coast. F. DALTON.         N. B.- Negatives will be preserved at the request of the patron.” Oregonian, 2 March – 3 April 1865 (The text changed over the course of the month. The recommendation of Shew was an addition.)

 

DALTON’S GALLERY ADS- PLENTY OF THEM- SEE DALTON, FRANK

 

1865: “Cardwell’s Gallery – It will be seen that the popular establishment, formerly known as Buchtel & Cardwell’s Gallery, on First street, and more recently as Dalton’s Gallery and Museum, has passed into the possession of Dr. Cardwell. Mr. Desmond, the somewhat famous artist, will remain in the establishment. Mr. Desmond is from the school of artists so popular in the East, and was once connected with the establishment of Brady, in New York. He has won considerable fame on the Pacific coast of late years, not a small part of which has been acquitted in Portland the past year.” Oregonian, 23 November 1865, pg. 3, col. 1.

1865: “Cardwell’s Gallery & Museum. No. 89 First Street, Portland, Oregon. Mr. Desmond – several years Brady’s Operator at New York City – will continue to take First-Class Card Pictures, and conduct the business as heretofore. J. R. Cardwell.” Oregonian, 23 November 1865 (first insertion)1866: “Cardwell’s Photographic Gallery & Museum. No. 89 First Street, Portland, Oregon. Mr. Desmond – several years Brady’s Operator at New York City – will continue to take First-Class Card Pictures, as heretofore. J. R. Cardwell.” Oregonian, 11 January 1866 (last insertion)

 

1866 Ellsworth & Cardwell Advertising

1866: “PHOTOGRAPHICAL- ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL, Proprietors of the CARDWELL GALLERY, 89 First Street, announce that they are fully prepared to meet the increasing demand for their First Class Pictures. Their CARTES DE VISITE are inimitable and beyond competition” Oregonian 9 April 1866 (first)

“NEW FIRM – Dr. Cardwell has associated with him in the business of Photographing, Mr. F. Ellsworth, who has lately arrived from the East. Mr. Desmond, who has earned a first-class reputation as an operator, will continue with the new firm. Read their card in another column.” The Daily Herald, (Portland) 12 April 1866 pg. 3, col. 2

“CARDWELL PHOTOGRAPHIC GALLERY, 89 First. Street, between Washington and Alder, Portland, Oregon. This old and well-known GALLERY & MUSEUM, having passed into the hands of the present proprietors, with additional new Stock and Material, they are now prepared to execute in the very highest style of the Art, Mammoth Photographs, Cartes de Visite, Ambrotypes, Melainotypes, In fact every style of picture of the ‘human face divine’. The services of the distinguished operator and artist Mr. R. A. Desmond, have been secured, which announcement is sufficient for the customers of this establishment. A cordial invitation to our friends, and the public generally is hereby extended to visit us, when we will use our best efforts to please. ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL, proprietors Cardwell Photographic Gallery, 89 First Street.” The Daily Herald, (Portland) 12 April 1866 pg. 3 (first insertion)

“FINE PICTURES- Ellsworth & Cardwell continue to take the lead in PHOTOGRAPHS, ALBUM and VISITING CARDS, AMBROTYPES, etc., at the Cardwell Gallery, 89 First Street, above Washington. The celebrated artist, Mr. Desmond, superintends the operating room. Persons may sit at any time from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.” Oregonian 13 – 18 April 1866

“A TRUE PICTURE- By calling on ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL at the CARDWELL PHOTOGRAPHIC GALLERY, 89 First Street, persons may get the MOST BEAUTIFUL as well as the MOST LIFE-LIKE PICTURE of themselves in this country. A single trial of the skill of MR. DESMOND, the distinguished Operator, will completely convince the most skeptical.” Oregonian 24 April 1866

“FACIAL EXPRESSION.- ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL at their gallery, 89 First Street, can show, and are now taking the most superb CARD PICTURES, PHOTOGRAPHS, AMBROTYPES, MELAINOTYPES, etc. Mr. Desmond is the Operator at this Establishment and stands without a rival here or elsewhere.” Oregonian 25 April 1866

There are three more months of similar daily advertising, which is not being included in this book.

“THE HUMAN FACE – What vast expression there is in the human face. Julius Caesar, Napoleon, Washington, Jackson, Grant, and other great generals possessed nobility of features both on and off the field of battle to a wonderful degree. To get the features in repose and beauty by Photography you must go to ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL’S GALLERY, 89 First St.” Oregonian 1-5 August 1866

“PICTURE FACT – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First Street, received by the last steamer an order from a gentleman with a prominent mercantile house (and a well known citizen of San Francisco) from which the following is an extract: ‘Please send me, by Wells, Fargo & Co., another dozen of those vignettes, and oblige yours,’ &c. As the writer is an excellent judge of photographic work and the fine arts, his letter to the above firm proved, beyond a doubt, that they can produce equal, if not superior, pictures at their gallery here to those coming from the first class establishment of the California metropolis.” Oregonian 7-8 August 1866

“ATLANTIC CABLE – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First Street, Have received no dispatch yet from Her Majesty, Queen Victoria, but it is presumed she is interested to know that they continue to furnish the most BEAUTIFUL PHOTOGRAPHS, in this section of the United States. Visitors to this GALLERY will please mention this fact in their dispatches to the Court of St. James.” Oregonian 14-15 August 1866

“PICTURE CONVENTION – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First Street, expects to hold a convention at their Photograph Gallery solely for the public good. Delegates from all parts of this State and the adjoining Territories arrive daily and present their faces to the above firm, which does away with the credentials and proxy business. The people at large are always welcome.” Oregonian 17-18 August 1866

“PICTURE COMMITTEE – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First Street, have been awarded a favorable report and the highest eulogies for the finest photographs and pictures of all kinds by the committee selected from the people at large. This of course settles all questions of quality and superiority. The gallery and museum continues to attract all classes.” Oregonian 21 August 1866 pg. 3 col. 4

“PICTURE VERDICT – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First Street, have received the verdict which pronounces that the Photographs, Sun Pearls, etc. from this Gallery are the finest ever produced on the Pacific coast. This accords with the opinion of transient residents, judges of art who always visit this establishment during their short stay. This firm are prepared to meet all demands in the picture line.” Oregonian 23-25 August 1866

“PHOTOGRAPHIC DIAMONDS – Ellsworth & Cardwell at their Gallery, 89 First Street, lead all others in the production of every kind of PICTURE and hold the same rank in the photographic art as the diamond, ruby, topaz, onyx, and emerald do among the precious gems. Within the last few days, this establishment has executed some specimens of exquisite workmanship and is fully prepared to hold its position at the front without fear of successful competition.” Oregonian 29 August 1866

“AUTUMNAL SHOWER – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First Street, would respectfully announce, that the present refreshing, beautiful shower of rain does not at all prevent them from taking those ELEGANT PHOTOGRAPHS, or, in fact, any kind of FIRST CLASS PICTURE. This Gallery is noted for its superb work even during the most unfavorable weather.” Oregonian 31 August 1866 pg. 2 col. 2

“GOLDEN SHIMMER – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First Street, use the purest gold in developing those CARTES DE VISITE, SUN PEARLS, and other productions of the photographic art. This is one of the few things which give tone to the PICTURES, as well as to the GALLERY of those gentlemen.The establishments of the Eastern States of San Francisco do not now pretend to surpass this in any department of the business.” Oregonian 5 September 1866 pg. 2 col. 3

“RAREST OF THE RARE – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First Street, have shown us some of their enameled photographic card pictures which are strikingly beautiful. This is the only gallery where can be obtained a specimen of this patented improvement of the art. Other kind (sic) of Pictures, such as SUN PEARLES, PEARL AMBROTYPES, PLAIN PHOTOGRAPHS, etc., furnished as usual.” Oregonian 10-11 September 1866 pg. 2 col. 3

“SILVER SHEEN – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First Street, Have succeeded in producing a photograph picture combining all those beautiful shades and effects which render them so superior to all others. The fact that this firm is now filling orders for pictures from San Francisco and all parts of this State and adjoining Territories tells the story. The kind of work executed at this gallery commends itself to all.” Oregonian 7 September 1866 pg. 2 col. 3

“THE PICTURE GALLERY – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First Street, take the FINEST PICTURES, and have the gallery par excellence, on the Pacific Coast, outside of San Francisco. And even that city, with all its wealth and facilities for doing business, cannot boast of a Photographic Establishment that can surpass this one for ARTISTIC STYLE and FINISH. Everything known to the Art executed in a FIRST CLASS manner.” Oregonian 15 September 1866

“NOTA BENE – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First Street, continue to attract public attention to their MAGNIFICENT PHOTOGRAPHS, CARTES DE VISITE, SUN PEARLS, ENAMELED CARD PICTURES, etc. the truth is this is the only GALLERY where you can get the genuine production of the art. This firm have lately received from New York some beautiful stereoscopic views of the White Mountains and vicinity.” Oregonian 17-19 September 1866 pg. 2 col. 3

“SPOTLESS – Ellsworth & Cardwell Photograph Gallery, 89 First Street, is the place to get those SPOTLESS SUN PEARLS, CARD PICTURES, PEARL AMBROTYPES, etc, etc. Experience tells us that ‘The best are always the cheapest’ which accounts for the large number of sitters who daily visit this Establishment. Pictures taken equally well in sunny or cloudy weather.” Oregonian 20-22 September 1866

“THE WONDERS OF PHOTOGRAPHY – Ellsworth & Cardwell, at their GALLERY, 89 First street, have shown us some of the most exquisite specimens of the Photographic Art ever executed here. Among the various styles seen at this establishment we might mention those magnificent and delicate toned SUN PEARLS, those superb PATENT ENAMELED PICTURES, those artistic ALBUM and VISITING CARDS, as well as PEARL AMBROTYPES, MELAINOTYPES, etc. All who value fine work will visit this Gallery without delay.” Oregonian, September 24-25 1866

“LOOK UPON THIS PICTURE’ Etc. – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First Street, invite the public to call and examine those beautiful PICTURES on exhibition at their GALLERY. The MUSEUM attached to this establishment contains many curiosities of the Taxidermist’s skill, and the Mineral Department is full of Geological Wonders.” Oregonian 27-29 September 1866 Oregonian 27-29 September 1866

“THE ART AMONG THE ANCIENTS – recent researches among the ruins of Pompeii (sic) and Herculaum have led some writers to think that the inhabitants of those ruined cities knew something of PHOTOGRAPHS. Whether this is so or not the most brilliant results are being brought out of the art at the present day, at the GALLERY of ELLSWORTH AND CARDWELL, 89 First Street, may be seen some exquisite gems in the PICTURE line that are unapproachable as works of art. We would advise those who wish to adorn their parlors and albums in a tasteful manner to give those gentlemen a call.” Oregonian 1-3 October 1866

“ELEGANT PICTURES- Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First street, are astonishing the art world and public generally with the most beautiful SUN PEARLS, CARD PHOTOGRAPHS, Crayons, Ambrotypes, etc. It is useless now to go or send to San Francisco or New York for fine work, as this GALLERY can furnish every style known to the art equally as good. Very young children should be brought before 12 o’clock.” Oregonian, 4-6 October 1866

“THE MORNING DEW DROP – Those splendid SUN PEARLS we saw at ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL’S GALLERY, 89 First street, the other day, are as fresh and rosy as the surface of a dew drop in the rays of the morning sunlight. All of the various styles of PICTURES known to the art are procurable at any time from this establishment.” Oregonian, 9-10 October 1866

“PURE AS CRYSTAL – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First street, finish SUN PEARLS, all styles of PHOTOGRAPHS, and every kind of PICTURE with tone equalling the pure crystal. This GALLERY excels all others for excellent work. A few passe partouts frames for PORCELAIN PICTURES arrived on the steamship Pacific.” Oregonian, 11-13 October 1866

“THE PLACE – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First street, is the place to get the finest SUN PEARLS, the finest PHOTOGRAPHS, the finest VIGNETTES – in fact ALL of the latest and finest productions of the art. We saw some magnificent specimens in those passe partouts frames which those gentlemen have recently imported. They are perfectly splendid and will no doubt be in demand by those who delight in the beautiful.” Oregonian, 15-17 October 1866

“ARTISTIC BEAUTY – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First street, are embellishing the albums of the country with the most BEAUTIFUL PICTURES, while the parlor and drawing-room walls of our citizens are adorned with the most elegant specimens of the photographic art – from this GALLERY. The advantage of having work done at a FIRST CLASS GALLERY like the above is hardly necessary now to urge.” Oregonian, 18-20 October 1866

“PICTURES AT THE FAIR – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 First street, sent no PICTURES to the State Fair this year. Those we saw there are not equal to those beautiful SUN PEARLS, PEARL AMBROTYPES, etc., which are daily produced at this GALLERY. As these gentlemen did not contend for a premium, the fact of anyone getting it will have no weight as to superiority. The public seem (sic) to be satisfied where to obtain the best. Pictures taken equally well under a cloudy or clear day.” Oregonian, 23-24 October 1866

“WONDERS OF ART – ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL 89 Front Street, have produced lately some of the MOST BEAUTIFUL SPECIMENS of the PHOTOGRAPHIC ART. Even those who have seen the finest productions in other parts of the world, give way to expressions of delight while viewing the pictures from this gallery. This establishment stands without a rival.” Oregonian, 26-29 October 1866

“ARTEMUS WARD – ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL 89 Front Street, have just learned that the old joker is now in London, contributing articles to Punch and being lionized generally. It is presumed that in his wanderings he does not forget the fact that the gentlemen whose names commence this paragraph still furnish the public with the most beautiful SUN PEARLS, and all other kinds of PICTURES.” Oregonian, 26-29 October 1866

“LOVELY PEARLS – ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL 89 Front Street, Have recently added some beautiful SUN PEARLS to their collection, and continue as usual to lead all others for fine PHOTOGRAPHS, ALBUM PICTURES, CARTES DE VISITE, MELAINOTYPES, etc. The excellence of the work done at this GALLERY receives the daily approbation of the public. The weather makes no difference in taking a picture.” Oregonian, 1-3 November 1866

“NO CARDS – When those words are added to a marriage notice, they must not be understood as meaning that the happy couple have not visited the PICTURE GALLERY of ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL 89 Front Street, and obtained a dozen of those SPLENDID CARD PICTURES, for which these gentlemen are so justly celebrated. Children should be brought in the forenoon.” Oregonian, 4-7 November 1866

“NICE – ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL 89 Front Street, notwithstanding the sifting rain, continue to exercise those magnificent PHOTOGRAPHIC PICTURES, which excel all others for beauty and durability. Chemistry has demonstrated the fact, and the proprietors of this establishment possess the secret, that pictures can be taken just as well whether it rains or shines. The public will please bear this in mind.” Oregonian, 8-10 November 1866

“WHERE SHALL WE GO FOR PICTURES? TO ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL 89 Front Street, of course. It is the only place where you are sure of being pleased. Everything emanating from this Gallery possesses the peculiar charm of attracting the attention of the most unsophisticated observer. All classes of the community visit this institution daily. SUN PEARLS, ALBUM CARDS, MELAINOTYPES, and every other style executed in the most superior manner.” Oregonian, 12-14 November 1866

“GET THE BEST – ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL 89 Front Street, furnish the very best PHOTOGRAPHS, SUN PEARLS, and every other kind of PICTURE known to the art. It is believed that the ancient Druids understood something of fine arts, but it has remained for this establishment to show its real beauties in fixing the features of the human face. It is not necessary to wait for a clear day.” Oregonian, 15-17 November 1866

“THE GALAXY – ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL 89 Front Street, have the largest collection of notable pictures in Oregon. This firm are executing, daily, those exquisite SUN PEARLS, splendid CARTES DE VISITE, or ALBUM PICTURES, etc., etc. At this GALLERY may be seen some of the restored artistic beauty found in the ruined palaces of the Incas.” Oregonian, 19-21 November 1866

“TUSCAN-SHADED. ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL 89 Front Street, produce the most elegant PICTURES of the present day. The camera obscura at this GALLERY is the ‘glass of fashion’, and truly reveals the ‘mould of form’. Some of the specimens we saw here lately look as though they were continuously fanned by a passing nephyr. We don’t know how it is but these gentlemen understand the art of ‘superb finishing’. Negatives taken in all kinds of weather.” Oregonian, 23-24 November 1866

“FOAM OF THE SEA – ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL 89 Front Street (Post Office block) are stunning the public gaze with those BEAUTIFUL PICTURES taken during the past rainy week. This is the only establishment where all specimens of the PHOTOGRAPHIC ART are produced equally well in any kind of weather. CARTES DE VISITE, AMBROTYPES, MELAINOTYPES, etc., furnished as usual to the patrons of this gallery.” Oregonian, 26-28 November 1866

“THE SPHINX – ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL 89 First Street (Post Office block) have just received information that by an imperial order, artists are engaged in taking photographic views of the Egyptian Sphinx, the Pyramids, and other relics of antiquity. Of course the firm are not geographically situated to obtain views of existing monuments of that wonderful people who flourished three thousand years before the Christian era, but they are fully able to execute the most BEAUTIFUL PICTURES of the human face and form. SUN PEARLS, CARDS, and all other styles taken in any kind of weather.” Oregonian, 1 December 1866

“PHOTOGRAPHIC NEWS – To get the best, go to ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL’S GALLERY (Post Office block) 89 First Street, they furnish the most elegant SUN PEARL, the most superb CARTE DE VISITE, the finest large PHOTOGRAPH, the brightest MELAINOTYPE, AMBROTYPE, or any other style known to the art. Work from this establishment holds rank with that of any other on the continent. Negatives taken during any kind of weather. Children should be brought in the forenoon.” Oregonian, 3-5 December 1866

“WHAT STYLE OF PICTURE – By going to ELLSWORTH 7 CARDWELL’S GALLERY, 89 First Street (Post office block) you can easily decide the above query. Modern Photography has taken immense strides since the time of the immortal Daguerre. At this Establishment are produced, and may be seen, the most valuable improvements of the Photographic art. PICTURES from this GALLERY are beyond all question the finest ever taken on this portion of the Pacific slope, Negatives made in any kind of weather.” Oregonian, 7-8 December 1866

“MOONOTYPES – ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL (Post Office block) 89 First Street, are informed that Prof. Draper, of New York, has again succeeded in obtaining another photograph of the moon. This remarkable occurrence exhibit -on of the wonders of the art. While the most scientific men of the age are engaged in great photographic experiments, the above gentlemen continue in the front rank as PICTURE takers. Evidence of this can be seen at all hours, at their GALLERY.” Oregonian, 10-12 December 1866

“HOLIDAYS – ELLSWORTH & CARDWELL 89 First Street (Post Office block) are executing some BEAUTIFUL PICTURES for the coming Holidays. As this firm have several engagements now, it would be well for those wishing SUN PEARLS, CARTES DE VISITE, etc., to call at once and have their orders filled. Children should be brought in before 12 o’clock. Negatives taken in all kinds of weather.” Oregonian, 13-14 December 1866

“PICTURE NOTICE – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 Front street (Post office block) would notify those wanting pictures that unless they call at their PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY before the first of January, it is not likely they will again have the opportunity for first-class work in this city. A word to the wise is sufficient. SUN PEARLS, ALBUM CARDS, and other styles executed in same superior manner as heretofore.” Oregonian, 17-19 December 1866

“TIS WELL – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 Front street (Post office block) would again call attention to the fact, that unless those persons wanting PICTURES call at their GALLERY before January 1st, they will be sure to regret it. The distinguished operator of this establishment leaves this city after New Year’s Day, and all those who desire SUN PEARLS, CARTES DE VISITE, AMBROTYPES, etc., in the very first style of the art should go at once. Negatives taken in all kinds of weather.” Oregonian, 20-22 December 1866

“MERRY CHRISTMAS AND HAPPY NEW YEAR – Ellsworth & Cardwell, 89 Front street (Post office block) would call attention to the fact that it is customary to present those you call on New Year’s Day with your PICTURE. Now those who are not supplied with CARTES DE VISITE, AMBROTYPES, SUN PEARLS, and other specimens of PHOTOGRAPHIC ART would do well to CALL AT THEIR GALLERY at once. Negatives taken in all kinds of weather.” Oregonian, 24 December 1866 – 1 January 1867

1867: Buchtel announces he is proprietor of the old Buchtel & Cardwell gallery. See Buchtel for text of this announcement. Oregonian, 21 January 1867.

1870: “Revenue Divisons. – … the division of this Internal Revenue District, with the names and address of the Assistant Assessors and number of the division… 4. B. P. Cardwell, Dalles – Baker, Grant, Union, Umatilla, and Wasco <counties>.” Roseburg Ensign (Roseburg), 26 November 1870 pg. 2, col. 6.

1886: “THE MECHANICS FAIR…(judges include B. P. Cardwell and J. R. Cardwell)” Oregonian, 17 October 1886, pg. 5, col. 3.

1887: “Personnel of the Pioneers (pioneers reunion in Portland)… 1852…Dr. J. R. Cardwell, Portland – Illinois,…B. P. Cardwell, Portland – Illinois…” Oregonian, 16 June 1887 pg. 3, col. 4.

1890: report of complex legal case involving how Police Commissioners are elected … “That the said B. P. Cardwell was elected as one of said police commissioners under said section seventy-two, on the third Monday in June, 1887, and was duly commissioned as such police commissioner for the term of three years from the first Monday in July, 1887. …” Oregonian, 26 August 1890, pg. 5, col. 3

1897: list of Oregon pioneers in attendance at reunion and parade in Portland, “1852 (year of arrival in Oregon)…B. P. Cardwell…” Weekly Oregonian, 18 June, 1897, pg. 4, col. 5

1903: “B. P. CARDWELL, OF CITY COUNCIL, DEAD. COUNCILMAN B. P. CARDWELL died at his home, 395 Fourth street, at 1:15 o’clock this afternoon. He has been ill for some time with a complaint of the liver.

  1. P. Cardwell was born in Springfield, Ill., in 1832. He came of old Virginian stock and was a blood relative of Gen. Robert E. Lee. He crossed the plains in 1852 over the old government trail, and located at Marysville, now Corvallis, which at that time was the head of navigation on the Willamette river. He started a pack train to the mines of Southern Oregon. After four years he sold out this business and took up a homestead on what is now known as Cardwell hills. He was an extensive raiser of stock for several years and came to Portland in ’58, and went into the photographing business with Joseph Buchtel.

In 1861 he was appointed by President Lincoln to be collector of internal revenue for the district of Oregon. This position he held for 21 years, when he resigned in ’72, and was appointed a police commissioner by Governor Moody. In the early eighties he served a term in the Oregon legislature. He has always been a staunch Republican and been identified with public life.

Two years ago he was elected councilman-at-large. He leaves a widow whom he married in 1856, when she was Miss Clark, an Indian missionary. His brothers are Dr. J. B. Cardwell, a dentist; Charles Cardwell, a farmer, living south of the city, and R. H. Cardwell, a business man of San Francisco. His only child is Dr. H. W. Cardwell, in the Abington block.” Oregon Journal, 26 November 1903, pg. 2, col. 1.

1903: “BYRON P. CARDWELL DIES. PROMINENT PIONEER AND COUNCILMAN PASSES AWAY. Held Office as Deputy Collector Internal Revenue, Police Commissioner and Representative. Byron Perrin Cardwell, an Oregon pioneer of 1852, and one of Portland’s most widely known citizens, died at his home at 395 Fourth street, at 1:15 o’clock yesterday afternoon. In August he was stricken with heart trouble, which resulted in his death.

Byron Perrin Cardwell was born in Springfield, Ill., March 3, 1832. He was the son of William Lee and Mary Ann Biddle Cardwell, both of Virginia.

At the age of 20 he accompanied his parents to Oregon, driving his own ox-team across the plains, and arriving at Marysville, now known as Corvallis, on October 8, 1852. The family took up donation land claims on what is now called Cardwell Hill, and Byron Cardwell raised blooded horses and cattle in partnership with his uncle, the late Hamilton Campbell.

With the late W. B. Carter he drove a large pack string of mules between Corvallis, Yreka, Cal., and Jacksonville, Or., for several years. In 1856 he married to Miss Abbie M. Clarke. In 1858 he moved to Portland and formed a partnership with Joseph Buchtel in the photograph business, which continued until he was appointed a Deputy Collector of Internal Revenue by President Lincoln about 1861.

He remained in this position until removed by President Cleveland under the celebrated ‘offensive partisanship’ order, after having served 21 years. During much of this time transportation facilities were nil, and he traveled over the state of Oregon from border to border on horseback, collecting taxes in gold dust and carrying it in saddle bags until some Wells-Fargo office was reached. He was a man of fine physique, a strong and daring rider, a splendid pistol shot, and reported to be absolutely devoid of fear.

It was his boast that he never lost a cent of Government money, but he had many exciting adventures with highwaymen, who thought Uncle Sam’s money fair prey.

Since 1895 he has devoted himself to private investments. He was a life-long Republican, and an earnest worker for the party’s success.

During Governor Moody’s administration he was appointed Police Commissioner for Portland, and by successive re-elections by the people remained as such for nine years. In 1894 he was elected a member of the State Legislature. At the last election he was compelled by a committee of citizens to accept the seat in the City Council for the Fifth Ward.

His religion was the golden rule, and it is doubtful if he had a personal enemy on earth. He was a man of the strictest business integrity, and his ‘word was as good as his bond.’

He is survived by his wife and his son, Dr. Herbert W.; by three brothers, Dr. James R. and Charles H. of this city and Richard H. Cardwell of San Francisco, and by two sisters, Ms. Olena M. Murray and Mrs. Martha A. Dalton. The late Dr. William B. Cardwell and the late Mrs. George E. Cole were his brother and sister. A daughter, Alice, died in 1863.” Oregonian, 27 November 1903, pg. 10, col. 3. includes portrait.

1903: “FATTY DEGENERATION KILLED B. P. CARDWELL. A post-mortem was held on the body of B. P. Cardwell this forenoon by Drs. Wilson, Glesy and Chalmers, which showed the cause of death to have been fatty degeneration of the heart and gravel in the gall-bladder. The funeral will take place at 1:30 p. m. Sunday from the <illegible word>, 394 Fourth street. Interment is at Lone Fir cemetery. Mayor Williams today appointed the following active pall bearers from the various city departments for the funeral of Councilman B. P. Cardwell: From the city council Councilmen Rumlin, Bentley, Albee and Sigler. From the executive board- W. Fleidner and Sig Sichel. Treasurer J. E. Weriein and City Auditor T. C. Devlin. The obsequies will be held from the family residence 395 Fourth street, on Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock. The city officials will attend as a body.” Oregon Journal, 27 November 1903, pg. 7, col. 2.

Bibliography

Brown, Robert O., Nineteenth Century Portland, Oregon Photographers: A Collector’s Handbook (author; Portland, 1991) pg. 4, 5, 19, 20, 52, 53, 55, 85, 91-93.

Hines, Harvey, An Illustrated History of The State Of Oregon, Chicago; Lewis Publishing Co, 1893 pg. 584-585 “B. P. Cardwell is an Oregon pioneer of 1852, who, during the administration of Abraham Lincoln in 1864, became connected with the Internal Revenue Department of Oregon, and for twenty-one consecutive years performed prompt and faithful service to his State and country. He was born upon the farm near Springfield, Illinois, in 1832 …(account of family ancestry, childhood, and overland emigration to Oregon)…

On his arrival our subject began work with his uncle, Hamilton Campbell, residing in Marion county, and a pioneer of 1839, who came to the State with Jason Lee, of missionary fame; with him our subject remained until 1853, then went to Corvallis, and with Samuel Alexander engaged in the mercantile business, which was continued about one year, when they sold out their stock, purchased a small pack train and began packing from Corvallis to Jacksonville and Yreka mines. Purchasing their own stock of flour, butter and miners’ supplies, and then selling to merchants or miners. This was carried on with profit for about eighteen months, when they sold the train to B. F. Dowell, who was fitting out an escort to protect the incoming immigrants from the Indians.

Mr. Cardwell then purchased a claim in connection with W. B. Carter of Benton county, a pioneer of 1852, and together they engaged in the stock business, which was followed until 1859, when subject sold his interest and stock and came to Portland, and the photographic firm of Buchtel & Cardwell was then organized, with galleries located at Salem, Corvallis, Astoria and the Dalles. They carried on a large and lucrative business for about five years, when Mr. Cardwell sold his interest and retired from the firm.

In September, 1864, Mr. Cardwell was appointed, under President Lincoln’s administration, Assistant Assessor and Deputy collector of Internal Revenue for the District of Oreton, and remained in that capacity until July, 1885, when, with the changed administration, resignations were in order and accepted. Mr. Cardwell then formed a partnership with B. E. Lippincott to engage in the real estate and custom-house brokerage business, which is still continued.

He was married in Benton county in 1856, to Miss Abbie M. Clark, daughter of William Clark, of South Hadley, Massachusetts, who emigrated to Oregon in 1852. Mr. and Mrs. Cardwell have one child, Herbert W., a graduate of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of New York city, and now a physician in the city of Portland.

Mr. Cardwell still resides in the old home, on the corner of Fourth and Harrison streets, which he established in 1860. For seven years he has been on the Board of Police Commissioners, first appointed by Governor Z. F. Moody, and subsequently elected by the Republican party. He was one of the incorporators and is president of Lone Fir Cemetery, also vice-president of Ancient Order Building Association, member of A. O. U. W., and stockholder and director of the Union Banking Company. He is actively interested in all enterprises which tend toward the growth and development of his State and city.”

Park, Harriet Word, Marriage Records of Multnomah County, Oregon 1855-1873, Portland; Genealogical Forum 1973 pg. 40. Mr. Frank Dalton of Lewiston, W. T., and Mrs. Martha A. Barngert of Multnomah County, married 24 July 1866, at the house of Mrs. Cardwell by G. H. Atkinson, Minister of the Gospel; witnesses Byron Cardwell, S. M. Parish, and others. Page 46 in Marriage Records Book 1 Jan 1855 to Aug 1865 at Multnomah County Courthouse. <author’s note- M. A. Dalton was the daughter of W. L. Cardwell, he was the brother of Byron P. and James R. Cardwell>

Hines, Harvey, An Illustrated History of The State Of Oregon, Chicago; Lewis Publishing Co, 1893 pg. 604-605 (Biography of J. R. Cardwell) “…Being a taxidermist and something of an ornithologist, he made the first collection of the birds and animals of the Willamette valley…”

Genealogical files in Oregon Historical Society.

Scrapbook of James R. Cardwell, Oregon Historical Society, Scrapbook No. 131.

 

 

Historic photos and images