Fiske, Bertrand E. (Portland)

Bertrand E. Fiske (ca. 1871 – 1912) (Portland)

Directory Listings
1903 PCD pg. 340 “Fiske, Bertrand E, letter carrier, P O, res 628 Clifton”
1904 PCD pg. 381 “Fiske, Bertrand E, manufacturing optician, 211-212 Macleay Bldg., Tel Main 1305, res 628 Clifton”
1904 AAP pg. 338 “Oregon Camera Club…Secretary, B. E. Fiske…”
1905 PCD pg. 416 “Fiske, Bertrand E, mnfg optician 211 Macleay Bldg, bds 628 Clinton”
1905 AAP pg. 343 “Oregon Camera Club…Secretary, B. E. Fiske…”
1906 PCD pg. 423 “Fiske, Bertrand E, Manufacturing Optician, 211 Macleay Bldg, res Patton rd, Portland Heights”
1910 PCD pg. 413 “Fiske, Bertrand E (B. E. Fiske & Co) h 568 Spring”, “Fiske, B. E. & Co. (Bertrand E. Fiske) mnfrs opticians 515 Macleay Bldg”

News Items and Advertisements
1912: “2 KILLED, 5 HURT AS AUTO HITS TREE
PORTLAND, July 23 — Bertrand E. Fiske, an optician with offices in the Macleay building and residing at 568 Spring street, and Miss Elizabeth Toohig, of San Francisco, who is visiting the family of John F. D. Martin, Jr., at 861 Frances avenue, were instantly killed at 10 o’clock tonight when the touring car owned and driven by Mr. Fiske left the Base Line road while rounding a curve on the north side of Mount Tabor at a rate
of probably 40 miles an hour.
Five other persons were in the car with them, but none of them was seriously hurt. Among them, it is reported
were P. F. Munsell, brother of Mrs. Fiske and John F. D. Martin, an optician employed by A. C. Feldenheimer.” Morning enterprise. (Oregon City), July 24, 1912, pg. 1, col. 1.

2 DIE, 5 HURT AS AUTO HITS TREE
Dr. Fiske Is Killed on Base Line Road.
SAN FRANCISCO GIRL VICTIM
Miss Toohig Dies While Under
Wrecked Car.
MT. TABOR CURVE IS FATAL
Dead Man Well Known, Being Prominently Connected in Manufacturing Enterprise–Fiske and Family Lived With Mother.
Bertrand E. Fiske, an optician with offices in the Macleay building and residing at 668 Spring street, and Miss Eilzabeth Toohig– of San Francisco, who is visiting the family of John F. D. Martin, Jr., at 861 GFrances (sic) avenue, were instantly killed at 10 o’clock last night when the touring car owned and
driven by Mr. Fiske left the Base Line road while rounding a curve on the north side of Mount Tabor at a rate of
probably 40 miles an hour.
Five other persons were in the car with them, but none of them was seriously hurt. Among them, it is reported, were P. F. Munsell, brother of Mrs. Fiske, and John F. D. Martin, an
optician employed by A. C Feldenheimer.
A man who occupied the front seat with Dr. Fiske and Miss Toohig, was caught under the car but crawled out unhurt. The four occupants of the rear seat jumped when the car left the
road and saved themselves.
Speed High at Curve.
That the machine was traveling at a terrific rate of speed is evidenced by the fact that it plowed deep into the side of the bank below the road for a distance of 40 feet before it collided heavily with a giant tree that stood in its path. The car was smashed almost to an unrecognizable mass by its impact with the tree.
The two victims were squeezed between the frame of the car and the tree. Death of Mr. Fiske probably was instantaneous. The woman lived a short while but was unconscious when those who had occupied the rear seat reached her. She died soon after they
picked her up.
The party was taking a late run into the country for pleasure before going home for the night.
They had been traveling over some of the city streets and evidently intended taking a short spin out the Base Line road. The machine was under perfect control and, although going at an excessive rate of speed, took the sharp turns on the road, as it
circles around Mount Tabor, gracefully.
Last Effort Futile.
What caused it to leave its path probably will never be known. As it reached a sharp curve it failed to respond to the steering apparatus. It went straight ahead. As the front wheels went over the side of the road Mr. Fiske gave a final but futile twist
to the steering wheel. It refused to work. In another instant the car was tearing down the hillside. The women screamed. The men called for them to leap.
Those in the rear seat had time to jump. As they stood up in the tonneau the car lurched. They landed on the soft earth in safety, thrown from the uncontrollable machine rather than having jumped. The others called for Mr. Fiske to
jump and to save himself. He stuck heroically to his seat thinking perhaps that he could stop the car and save
the lives of those in the seat with him. He died at his post, his hands clutching the steering wheel.
As soon as they had recovered from their fright those who had been in the tonneau went for aid. The body of Miss Toohey was taken to Holman’s. P. F. Munsill, a brother-in-law took charge of that of Mr. Fiske, which was taken to the establishment of the Skewes Undertaking Company.
Fiske Lived With Mother.
Bert Fiske was an optician, with offices in the Macleay building. He and his family lived with his mother. Mrs. Q. V. Harrell, at 568 Spring street, on Portland Heights. He was for eight or ten years in the Postofflce service in Portland before he became an optician.
Mr. Fiske’s wife and children were at Ocean Park last night when the accident occurred. His daughter, June, 14 years old. has been there about a week. Mrs. Fiske left for Ocean Park on the steamer Hassalo yesterday morning, and their son, Norman, 17 years of age. left on the train for the same place. They were to pass a few weeks there with Mrs. Fiske’s parents. Dr. and Mrs.
T. W. Munsell.
Dr. Fiske was about 41 years old. He was the son of Captain James Fiske, a pioneer assayer, who died in Italy about five years ago. He was secretary and treasurer of Fiske, Trullinger & Giles, manufacturers’ agents. His own firm of manufacturing
opticians was under the name of B. E. Fiske & Company, manufacturing opticians.” Morning Oregonian, July 24, 1912, pg. 1, col. 1.

Historic photos and images